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Partner Activities: BAOBAB for Women's Human Rights

The following is a list of activities relating to our partner BAOBAB for Women's Human Rights in Nigeria.

BAOBAB: Stop Violent Punishments against Women Radio Campaign

BAOBAB For Women's Human Rights is a women's human rights organization, which focuses on women's legal rights issues under the three (3) systems of law - customary, statutory and religious laws in Nigeria. The organization evolved from an ad hoc group of activists, social scientists, lawyers, and specialists in Muslim laws and Arabic who were responsible for executing the Women and Laws Nigeria project, under the auspices of the International Solidarity Network of Women Living Under Muslim Laws from 1993 to 1996. In 1996, BAOBAB as presently constituted formally came into being. BAOBAB operates from a national office in Lagos and with outreach teams in 14 states across Nigeria and is considered one of the leading voices in Nigeria advocating against cruel and violent forms of punishments against women in the name of 'culture'.

2012 International Women's Day: Connecting Girls, Inspiring futures

March 8, 2012

The 8th of March of every year is a day set aside by the United Nations as International Women’s Day (IWD). It is a day to recognise, celebrate and honour women’s struggles and achievements in the past years and to call attention to other areas of concerns that are critical to women’s life in particular and the society in general.

Nigeria: Favour Irabor - Money, religion & patriarchy pose problems for female politicians

September 4, 2011

It’s over four months now since the last general elections, but Nigerian women politicians and even stakeholders are yet to recuperate from the shock of its outcome. Unlike previous elections, women vied enmass for various political offices, but  few of them got in! As a response to this fall which has also translated into an abysmal reduction in the representation of women in political offices(apart from the ministerial offices), the question of ‘what went wrong?’  has continued to take centre-stage at most women gatherings.