Browse by Country

Browse by Region

You are here

Home » Early or Forced marriage

Resources: Early or Forced marriage

The Missing Link: A Joined Up Approach to Addressing Harmful Practices in London

September, 2011

This study was commissioned and funded by the Greater London Authority to address a knowledge gap on the needs of black, minority ethnic and refugee (BMER) women experiencing harmful practices (HPs). The specific aim of the study was to provide a document which would help to engage commissioners, funders, policy-makers and frontline practitioners to improve the way London responds to HPs. The study was carried out between December 2010 and March 2011.

Nepal: Preliminary Mapping of Gender Based Violence

January, 2012
Asia Foundation

Research carried out in 2008 in Surkhet and Dang districts in Nepal reveals that 81 percent of women face domestic violence frequently. This is a clear indication of the high level of domestic violence prevalent in Nepali society. Nepali women and girls are vulnerable to both domestic violence and public violence.

Gender-Based Violence in Southern Sudan: Justice for Women Long Overdue

December, 2011

A Study for the Enough Project by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School

INTRODUCTION

Southern Sudan has a history of gender-based violence (GBV) during times of conflict and instability. GBV is any act of violence against women that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.2

Survey on Forced Marriage in Immigrant Communities in the United States

September, 2011

The Tahirih Justice Center (Tahirih) is one of the nation’s foremost legal defense organizations protecting women and girls fleeing human rights abuses. Through direct legal services, public policy advocacy, and public education and outreach, since 1997, Tahirih has assisted over 12,000 immigrant women and children from all over the world fleeing such abuses as domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, torture, female genital mutilation, “honor” crimes, and forced marriage. Tahirih also leads national advocacy campaigns on a range of issues, building on our direct services experiences, to press for systemic changes in laws, policies, and practices to better protect women and girls from violence.

Guide to Establishing the Asylum Eligibility of Victims of Human Trafficking and Forced Marriage

January, 2011

Every year, hundreds of thousands of people become victims of human trafficking or forced marriage. Some are taken away from their home countries and moved abroad, where they are forced to engage in prostitution, other forms of labor, or marriage. Others are trafficked internally within their countries of origin. Those who escape or are rescued may want nothing more than to return home. Others may legitimately fear being punished or re-trafficked if they return. Trafficked persons who do not wish to return home must seek protection in another country.

Agency Practice Guidelines for Forced Marriage

January, 2011

This report was written by Eleanor Stobart on behalf of the Forced Marriage Unit (a joint Foreign & Commonwealth Office and Home Office Unit) in collaboration with the Association of Chief Police Officers, Crown Prosecution Service, Department for Children, Schools and Families, Department for Communities and Local Government, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, Department of Health, Ministry of Justice and the Welsh Assembly Government. The Forced Marriage Unit would like to express their gratitude to all those involved in the drafting of these guidelines.

Confronting Gender-Based Violence against Women and Girls in Chad.

September, 2011
UNICEF

UNICEF's Cheryl Uys-Allie reports on initiatives led by women to confront gender-based violence against women and girls in Chad. Watch the video below.


Solutions to End Child Marriage: What Evidence Shows

September, 2011
International Centre for Research on Women

Child marriage is increasingly recognized as a serious problem, both as a violation of girls' human rights and as a hindrance to key development outcomes. As more resources and action are committed to addressing this problem, it becomes important to examine past efforts and how well they have worked. ICRW summarizes a systematic review of child marriage prevention programs that have documented evaluations. Based on this synthesis of evaluated programs, the authors offer an analysis of the broader implications for viable solutions to child marriage.