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Gender-Based Violence in Southern Sudan: Justice for Women Long Overdue

December, 2011

A Study for the Enough Project by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School

INTRODUCTION

Southern Sudan has a history of gender-based violence (GBV) during times of conflict and instability. GBV is any act of violence against women that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.2

Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women Report to UN General Assembly 2011

August, 2011

This is the first written report submitted by the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Rashida Manjoo, to the General Assembly, pursuant to General Assembly resolution 65/187. The report provides an overview of the mandate’s work and main findings and the challenges it continues to encounter, and presents specific recommendations to address violence against women through a holistic framework based on States’ obligations to respect, protect and fulfil the human rights of women and girls.

Confronting Gender-Based Violence against Women and Girls in Chad.

September, 2011
UNICEF

UNICEF's Cheryl Uys-Allie reports on initiatives led by women to confront gender-based violence against women and girls in Chad. Watch the video below.


Silent No More: The untapped potential of the church in addressing sexual violence

March, 2011

This report, Silent No More, calls all churches to account and to action. It paints a painfully honest picture of the way churches have perpetuated a culture of silence around sexual violence and have largely failed to respond to the crisis and may even worsen the impact by reinforcing stigma and discrimination experienced by survivors.

It’s Not Just Domestic Violence: The Beginner’s Guide to 16 Types of Violence Against Women

December, 2010
The Pixel Project

There are many reasons why Violence Against Women is possibly the most widespread and intractable human rights violations in human history: It is embedded in social structures; It is part of cultural customs; It is due to gender inequality; It is due to gender-based economic inequality; It is due to patriarchal strictures… the list of factors goes on and on and many have expounded on it.

Yet even while it is so entrenched an issue, many people have problems recognising gender-based violence even when they are come face-to-face with it simply because:

UPR Submission on Sexual Rights in Tajikistan

March, 2011
Equal Opportunities, LGBT Organization Labrys, The Sexual Rights Initiative


Equal Opportunities (Tajikistan), LGBT Organization Labrys (Kyrgyzstan) and The Sexual Rights Initiative submitted report on Sexual Rights in Tajikistan for the 12th Round of the Universal Periodic Review in October 2011.

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a new and unique mechanism of the United Nations which started in April 2008 and consisting of the review of the human rights practices of all States in the world, once every four years. For more details please visit web site http://www.upr-info.org.

Slideshow: Mukhtar Mai - Giving hope to women in Pakistan

November, 2008


This is a slideshow of women and girls who have sought refuge in women's shelters in Pakistan set up by activist Mukhtar Mai.

Shahnaz Bibi, left, a woman staying in a women's shelter founded by Mukhtar Mai. The women in Mukhtar's shelter are extraordinary, partly because in a culture where women are supposed to be weak, they are indomitable.

 

No Justice in Justifications: Violence Against Women in the Name of Culture, Religion and Tradition

March, 2010
Shaina Grieff

English |  Français 

This briefing presents a survey of culturally justified violence against women, including how violence against women is justified by 'culture', the different forms this violence can take, and recommendations for change. The SKSW Campaign is undertaking projects on 'culture', women and violence, with partners in Senegal, Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran, and Sudan.