Filter by country:

You are here

Home

Parallel Legal Systems

Stoning: Legal or Practised in 16 Countries and Showing No Signs of Abating

April, 2014

This brief report was created by WLUML as a submission to the UN Secretary General for the 27th session of the Human Rights Council (HRC) on the question of the death penalty.

WLUML outline the latest developmentes in the practice of stoning around the world, with specific emphasis on stoning where it is practised as a death penalty (Iran and Somalia).  WLUML call for attention to stoning as a gendered human rights violation, and to the repressive and unstable legal and political contexts which form the background to stoning.  We ask the HRC to address stoning as part of its session on the death penalty, and to address all countries where stoning remains on the law books.

UN: First International Day of the Girl Child - 11 October 2012

October 11, 2012
Forced Child Marriage, Slavery Like Reality in Every Region of the World
Joint Statement* by a group of UN human rights experts to mark the first International Day of the Girl Child, Thursday 11 October 2012

 

التجريم حسب النوع: النظر لقوانين الزنا باعتبارها عنفا ضد المرأة في البيئات الإسلامية

March, 2010
Ziba Mir Hosseini

English | Français |  Bahasa Indonesia |  فارسی 

In this discussion paper, I show how zina laws and the criminalization of consensual sexual activity can also be challenged from within Islamic legal tradition. Far from mutually opposed, approaches from Islamic studies, feminism and human rights perspectives can be mutually reinforcing, particularly in mounting an effective campaign against revived zina laws. By exploring the intersections between religion, culture and law that legitimate violence in the regulation of sexuality, the paper aims to contribute to the development of a contextual and integrated approach to the abolition of zina laws. In so doing, I hope to broaden the scope of the debate over concepts and strategies of the SKSW Campaign.

Memidanakan Seksualitas: Hukum Zina sebagai Kekerasan terhadap Perempuan dalam Konteks Islam

March, 2010
Ziba Mir Hosseini

Dalam tradisi hukum Islam, semua hubungan seksual di luar nikah yang sah dipandang sebagai suatu kejahatan. Kategori utama dari kejahatan ini adalah zina, yang didefinisikan sebagai hubungan seksual terlarang antara laki-laki dan perempuan. Pada akhir abad ke-20, kebangkitan Islam sebagai kekuatan politik dan spiritual memicu dihidupkannya kembali hukum zina dan pembuatan berbagai ketentuan atas pelanggaran-pelanggaran baru yang mempidanakan tindakan seksual konsensual dan memberikan wewenang bagi terjadinya kekerasan terhadap perempuan. Para aktivis telah berkampanye untuk menolak ketentuan tersebut atas dasar hak asasi manusia (HAM). Dalam makalah ini, saya menunjukkan bagaimana upaya menentang hukum zina dan kriminalisasi hubungan seksual konsensual dapat dilakukan dari dalam tradisi hukum Islam sendiri. Sebenarnya, pendekatan berdasar pemikiran Islam, feminisme dan HAM bisa saling menguatkan, terutama berkenaan dengan kampanye yang lebih efektif dalam merespon kebangkitan hukum zina. Dengan menelusuri kesalingterkaitan (intersection) antara agama, budaya dan hukum yang memberikan legitimasi pada penggunaan kekerasan dalam berbagai aturan tentang seksualitas, makalah ini bertujuan untuk memberi sumbangan pada pengembangan pendekatan kontekstual dan integratif untuk menghapus hukum zina. Melalui upaya ini, saya berharap bisa memperluas cakupan perdebatan terkait konsep dan strategi Kampanye SKSW.

Criminaliser la sexualité - Les lois relatives à la zina, une violence à l’égard des femmes dans les contextes musulmans

March, 2010
Ziba Mir Hosseini

La tradition juridique islamique traite tout rapport sexuel hors mariage comme un crime. La principale catégorie de crimes de ce type est la zina, qui s’entend de tout rapport sexuel illicite entre un homme et une femme. Á la fin du vingtième siècle, la résurgence de l’islam comme force politique et spirituelle a entraîné la réintroduction des lois relatives à la zina et la création de nouveaux délits qui criminalisent l’activité sexuelle consensuelle et autorisent la violence à l’égard des femmes. Des activistes militent contre ces nouvelles lois pour défendre les droits humains. Dans ce document de synthèse, je montre comment contester également les lois relatives à la zina et la criminalisation de l’activité sexuelle consensuelle, de l’intérieur de la tradition juridique islamique. Loin d’être mutuellement opposées, les approches du féminisme et des perspectives des droits humains qui découlent des études islamiques, peuvent se renforcer mutuellement, en particulier pour lancer une campagne effective contre la réintroduction des lois relatives à la zina. En explorant les intersections de la religion, de la culture et du droit qui légitiment la violence dans la réglementation de la sexualité, l’article vise à contribuer à l’élaboration d’une approche contextuelle et intégrée de l’abolition des lois relatives à la zina. J’espère, ce faisant, élargir le champ du débat sur les concepts et les stratégies de la campagne SKSW .

UN: Harmful Traditional Practices - statement by Rashida Manjoo, UNSRVAW

June 27, 2012

Throughout the world, there are practices that are violent towards women and girls and harmful to their well-being overall. Young girls are circumcised, bound by severe dress codes, denied property rights or killed for the sake of honour in the family. Although these and other practices constitute a form of violence, they have often avoided national and international scrutiny because they are seen as traditional practices that deserve tolerance and respect. This highlights how the universality of human rights is often denied when it comes to the rights of women and girls, and how cultural relativism can be wrongly used to allow for inhumane and discriminatory practices against women.

Sierra Leone: Fighting for women’s right to land

June 22, 2012

FREETOWN - Shortly after her father died, Sia Bona’s husband’s family took over her father’s oil-palm plantation and rice paddies, and drove her and her mother from their home. “I came from riches, but now I am poor,” said the 45-year-old teacher from Koidu town in eastern Sierra Leone. 

Pages